"Some birds aren't meant to be caged, their feathers are just too bright"- Morgan Freeman, Shawshank Redemption. This blog is from one such bird who couldn't be caged by organizations who mandate scripted software testing. Pradeep Soundararajan welcomes you to this blog and wishes you a good time here and even otherwise.

Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Test Case Passed! Who cares?

This will take away at least 8 minutes and 24 seconds of your time, so please be careful if you'd like to spend your time on a thing that potentially has a risk of not yielding any good thing for you as a tester. Maybe you might want to continue executing test cases instead of going through this. Click on the image to waste 8 minutes and 24 seconds. You are lucky if you don't have a MS Powerpoint or Open Office suite or anything of that sort because without that you can't waste 8 minute and 24 seconds that I am repeatedly mentioning.





-- Pradeep Soundararajan - http://testertested.blogspot.com - +91-98451-76817 - pradeep.srajan@gmail.com

"Pradeep's first language is not English--his first language appears to be testing." -- Michael Bolton

8 comments:

Ajoy Kumar Singha said...

Hi Pradeep,

I must say your last two posts, "The most challenging software testing quiz" and "Test Case Passed! Who cares?" are among the finest lessons delivered by you. I am eager to see more such posts. Thanks buddy.

Pradeep Soundararajan said...

@Ajoy,

It occurs to me when I read your comment that the last two posts have been the finest -- which also indirectly conveys that the previous posts haven't been fine.

In case you wanted to mean that posts in this blog are generally good for mental health and in the recent past it is getting better and better - I'd request you to re-phrase it.

Every post has involved more or less same time. You'd be surprised that there are at least 50 posts of mine that I discarded because it didn't pass my critical tests. I'd like to give my reader's the best.

As I keep saying - I was and am the first reader of my blog - if it doesn't help me as a reader - I dont post something at all and I am a hard critique of myself - so I tend to give posts that might be good in many testers eyes.

I too am eager to see better posts and here is a fact about the previous two posts - I have spent at least 15 hours on each of them before I posted it and I enjoyed all the time I spent crafting it.

If an article on testing is fantastic to read but does not help you do better testing - it is no longer fantastic.

Rahul Verma said...

Hi Pradeep,

I found the presentation very informative. The way you have put it together and the creativity involved is superb!

Regards,
Rahul Verma

Anonymous said...

* This article is not all a good one.
* I did waste my (valuable) time(atleast 8min and 24seconds) by clicking on the image that you had put in this post..
*Iam not lucky because I had MS Powerpoint or Open Office suite or anything of that sort in my pc.
* I did not learn that any lesson that you mentioned in this post.
* I don't go through rst.pdf
as you recommend.
* This story is completely boring to me.

Pradeep Soundararajan said...

@Anonymous,

You learned an important lesson that other testers who might have gone through this did not learn and here I am framing it for your - Going through my blog might be a bigger waste of time, which might not help you become a better tester (if you want to be) and hence don't spend further time on this.

Also I think you should start saying about the boring stuff here to others and recommend them not to come here because it is a waste of their time, too.

I thank you for your time and comment and you helped me learn something - you might be a coward.

Shrini Kulkarni said...

A good one again to serve "rapid testing and context driven testing" lessons in "super plain English" (with apologies to Michael Bolton - Software Testing in plain English") ...

As I read through the iterations that "Expected results" sections goes through, I realised that there is an important lesson for all who consider a scripted test as the "ultimate referene" or "the final check".

Cem Kaner in one of his presentations, mentioned (not the exact words) "As a software testers we cater to multiple stakeholders. Testers look for different problems for diffrent stakeholders". I would further add that testers look for diffrent problems other than the ones mentioned (or derived from) in test case, any form of specification or reference.

This presentation of yours also exposes the fact that test cases often hide lot and can mean different to diffrent people.

I liked your "anti-patters" as in "I don't recommend you to use oracles ....."

I found that slide-show version of ppt was rather slow (due to animation) and often got impatient to quickly see next line.

Shrini

Pradeep Soundararajan said...

@Shrini,

As I read through the iterations that "Expected results" sections goes through, I realised that there is an important lesson for all who consider a scripted test as the "ultimate referene" or "the final check".

Yes and you might also have observed the impossibility of having a good exhaustive expected result for each test case.

I found that slide-show version of ppt was rather slow (due to animation) and often got impatient to quickly see next line.

However fast the animation was you are too curious a person and you might still feel impatient :)

Ayreej Rahman said...

Thanks Pradeep
thanks for sharing!